Hey, I'm Irish! Hey, I'm Native American! The Importance of Food to Tradition

I’ve often written about how hunting connects me with my ancestors as well as the natural world around me.  Sometimes people, okay, mostly vegetarians and vegans, criticize this because they say we should move on from that, we don’t need to live that way anymore. Yet, many of these same people can be seen drinking green beer on St. Patrick’s Day or waxing poetic about their Spanish ancestors.  As humans, we have some deep seeded need to know where we come from and this is why genealogy services like Ancestry.com or 23 and Me are huge businesses.  Wanting to connect to our ancestors is normal and is something cultures have done since the beginning of man.

If I’m asked to self-identify, I’ll use words like, “father”, “husband”, “hunter”, or “American”.  If we’re talking culture, I’ll proudly talk about how both sides of my family have been in Appalachia for over 200 years; my father’s family almost exclusively in East Tennessee and my mother’s family from Virginia and western Pennsylvania. And like many folks from this region, it’s safe to assume that the majority of our ancestors came from what is now the Scottish Lowlands and Northern England and it’s also safe to assume there’s some Native American in our lineage, usually Cherokee.  This is important to us, just as it’s important for the guy who has lived in Chicago or Boston all of his life to tell you he’s Irish, even when his ancestors arrived at Ellis Island during the potato famine. 

People also take pride in carrying on the traditions of their ancestors. This may be as extreme as participating in Scottish Games or it could just be growing tomatoes “like grandma used to do”.  We accept all of this as not only normal, but it’s looked upon favorably to connect to these traditions and this is especially true when it comes to food. The folks who call themselves Irish like to eat traditional foods and drink Guinness or Bushmills.  In my house it’s a mix of hillbilly traditions and my wife’s Polish traditions, but so many of those things are centered around food and drink.  

So, I have to ask, if food and drink are so important to us in carrying on those traditions, if we like to garden like our grandmothers used to do, why is it so hard for so many people to view hunting in this same way?  Why is it that their traditions, especially when it comes to eating meat dishes, are cherished, while ours are attacked as barbaric? Why is spending all day in the kitchen preparing corned beef and cabbage so different than spending all day in a tree stand trying to catch a whitetail?  

It might be hard for people to understand our traditions, they are ours, not theirs, but food and tradition go hand in hand.  Think of how many years Jews have sat down with their families to enjoy a Passover meal together – sharing food is sacred.  Perhaps the struggle the anti-hunters face is their inner conflict of knowing that they’re a lot more like us than they want to admit. I’m not the first person to suggest that the best way to someone’s heart is through their stomach, but perhaps it is time to think about inviting people over to your house some time-honored traditions of eating your harvests.